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Tip: Understanding Rank

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you do a search, you can sort the results bibliographically alphabetical or by “rank”. What is Rank?

Rank refers to the search engine’s “best guess” as to the relevance of the result to the search you specified. The exact method of ranking used varies a bit depending on the search. In its most basic level, when you specify a single search term, rank looks at the density of the matches for the word in the document, and how close to the beginning of the document they appear as a measure of importance to the paper’s topic. The documents with the most matches and where the term is deemed to have the most importance, have the highest “relevance” and are ranked first (presented first).

When you specify more than one term to appear anywhere in the article, the method is similar, but the search engine looks at how many of those terms appear, and how close together they appear, how close to the beginning of the document, and can even take into account the relative rarity of the search terms and their density in the retrieved file, where infrequent terms count more heavily than common terms.

To see a simple example of this, search for the words (not the phrase, so no quotes):

unconscious communications

Look at the density of matches in each document on the first page of the hits. Then go to the last page of matched documents, and observe the density of matches within the documents.

A more complex search illustrates this nicely with a single page and only 15 matches:

counter*tr* w/25 “liv* out” w/25 enact*

There are a lot of word forms and variants of the words (due to the * wildcards) above that can match, but the proximity (w/25) clause limits the potential for matching. What’s interesting here though is how easily you can see the match density decrease as you view down the short list.

The end result of selecting order by rank is that the search engine’s best “guess” as to which articles are more relevant appear higher on the list than less relevant articles.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

 
Documentaries
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1. 
Klein, M. (2016). Melanie Klein walking in her garden. PEP Videostream, 1(5):8.
 

Melanie Klein walking in her garden.

2. 
Ioannou, A. (2013). Un Familiar Places. PEP Videostream, 1(1):6.
 

This is a short film that zooms into fragments of the psychoanalytic experience.

The abstract animated form, placed in live action representing the daily reality, is utilized to turn mental configurations to images Abstract configurations are intended to be seen as Paul Wells says in his book Understanding Animation (1998), namely “the facilitators for the creation of a space of understanding rather than the bearers of meaning themselves”.

This film and this essay constitute an interest into the topic of presenting or representing the psychoanalytic experience to the public. I have not but touched the matter but I hope this work to function as an introduction to a deeper study into the matter.

3. 
Forrester, J. Gessert, A. Grose, A. Leader, D. Nobus, D. Pick, D. Worthington, A. Marianski, S. (2015). What is Psychoanalysis: Part 3: The Oedipus Complex. PEP Videostream, 1(3):11.
 

'What is Psychoanalysis?' is a 4-part educational film series for students and teachers. Primarily aimed at A-Level Psychology students studying the 'psychodynamic approach', these films are intended to facilitate first encounters with Freud's thought..

4. 
Forrester, J. Gessert, A. Grose, A. Leader, D. Nobus, D. Pick, D. Worthington, A. Marianski, S. (2015). What is Psychoanalysis: Part 2: Sexuality. PEP Videostream, 1(3):10.
 

'What is Psychoanalysis?' is a 4-part educational film series for students and teachers. Primarily aimed at A-Level Psychology students studying the 'psychodynamic approach', these films are intended to facilitate first encounters with Freud's thought..

5. 
Jaffe, L. (2013). IPA 100 Year Retrospective: 1910 - 2010: The Next 100 Years. PEP Videostream, 1(1):3.
 

This film was created to celebrate the IPA Centennial. It begins with actual footage of Freud speaking in English, explaining why he created the IPA and describing his struggles to establish psychoanalysis. This is followed by Leo Rangell, IPA Past-president, narrating a history of the IPA with commentaries by numerous IPA luminaries, along with photos from past IPA Congresses.

6. 
Lee, Z. Palmer, S. Birksted-Breen, D. Humble, C. (2020). The Enigma of the Hour - The International Journal of Psychoanalysis Centenary Exhibition. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. Video Collection, 1(1):5.
 

This exhibition in Freud's last home marks the centenary of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis founded by Ernest Jones under the direction of Sigmund Freud. The enigma of the hour, the analytic hour, an hour both timeless and strictly bound by time, the search for an answer which can never be fully found. In Freud's consulting room, temporality, the temporality of the unconscious, the intermingling and interlacing of past, present, and future is an overriding theme. Rhythm, reverberation, resonance, a play between words and objects, sensations, emotions with no words, the disjunction between words and experience.

7. 
Forrester, J. Gessert, A. Grose, A. Leader, D. Nobus, D. Pick, D. Worthington, A. Marianski, S. (2015). What is Psychoanalysis: Part 4: The Id, the Ego and the Superego. PEP Videostream, 1(3):12.
 

'What is Psychoanalysis?' is a 4-part educational film series for students and teachers. Primarily aimed at A-Level Psychology students studying the 'psychodynamic approach', these films are intended to facilitate first encounters with Freud's thought..

8. 
Forrester, J. Gessert, A. Grose, A. Leader, D. Nobus, D. Pick, D. Worthington, A. Marianski, S. (2015). What is Psychoanalysis: Part 1: Is it Weird?. PEP Videostream, 1(3):9.
 

'What is Psychoanalysis?' is a 4-part educational film series for students and teachers. Primarily aimed at A-Level Psychology students studying the 'psychodynamic approach', these films are intended to facilitate first encounters with Freud's thought..

9. 
Miqueu-Baz, C. Susman, D. (2013). British Psychoanalysis Yesterday and Today. Instit. Psa UK AV Proj. Videostream, 1(1):4.
 

A selection of short interviews filmed in Freud's and also Anna Freud's consulting rooms (reconstructed in London at their house which became the Freud Museum). Jan Abram, Michael Brearley, Catalina Bronstein, Josh Cohn, Leon Kleimberg, Gregorio Kohon and Rosine Perelberg depict how London became the centre of European Psychoanalysis, with the arrival of Freud fleeing Nazi Germany. The interviews depict how immigration from Continental Europe created an openness that encouraged new ideas and discussion about what was and what was not psychoanalysis. Also we see how the British Society was able, despite differences between the different factions, to contain prominent figures such as Anna Freud, Klein, Winnicott and Bion and became an important hub for the progression of new thinking and new practices in psychoanalysis.

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