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Tip: Understanding Rank

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you do a search, you can sort the results bibliographically alphabetical or by “rank”. What is Rank?

Rank refers to the search engine’s “best guess” as to the relevance of the result to the search you specified. The exact method of ranking used varies a bit depending on the search. In its most basic level, when you specify a single search term, rank looks at the density of the matches for the word in the document, and how close to the beginning of the document they appear as a measure of importance to the paper’s topic. The documents with the most matches and where the term is deemed to have the most importance, have the highest “relevance” and are ranked first (presented first).

When you specify more than one term to appear anywhere in the article, the method is similar, but the search engine looks at how many of those terms appear, and how close together they appear, how close to the beginning of the document, and can even take into account the relative rarity of the search terms and their density in the retrieved file, where infrequent terms count more heavily than common terms.

To see a simple example of this, search for the words (not the phrase, so no quotes):

unconscious communications

Look at the density of matches in each document on the first page of the hits. Then go to the last page of matched documents, and observe the density of matches within the documents.

A more complex search illustrates this nicely with a single page and only 15 matches:

counter*tr* w/25 “liv* out” w/25 enact*

There are a lot of word forms and variants of the words (due to the * wildcards) above that can match, but the proximity (w/25) clause limits the potential for matching. What’s interesting here though is how easily you can see the match density decrease as you view down the short list.

The end result of selecting order by rank is that the search engine’s best “guess” as to which articles are more relevant appear higher on the list than less relevant articles.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

 
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Results 1 - 30 of 179 for your search on "since 2001; Sources citing: </b>Davies, J.M. (2004). Whose Bad Objects Are We Anyway? Repetition and Our Elusive Love Affair with Evil. Psychoanal. Dial., 14(6):711-732.<b>":

1. 
Benjamin, J. (2013). The Bonds of Love: Looking Backward. Studies in Gender and Sexuality, 14(1):1-15. […]
 
2. 
Botticelli, S. (2010). Thinking the Unthinkable: Anal Sex in Theory and Practice. Studies in Gender and Sexuality, 11(3):112-123. […]
 
3. 
Dott, P. (2014). Ernsthafte Erkrankung des Psychotherapeuten - eine explorative Studie. Psyche – Z Psychoanal., 68(6):489-516. […]
 
4. 
Newberger, J. (2015). The (K)Not of Self-Disclosure: One Therapist's Experience. Psychoanal. Soc. Work, 22(1):39-51. […]
 
5. 
Lord, S.A. (2008). Therapeutic Work with Trauma, Revictimization, and Perpetration: Bearing Witness, Offering Hope, Embracing Despair. Psychoanal. Soc. Work, 15(2):110-131. […]
 
6. 
Irving, K. (2019). The Role of Humor in Priming Intersubjectivity. Psychoanal. Psychol., 36(3):207-215. […]
 
7. 
Strozier, C.B. Strug, D.L. Pinteris, K. Kelley, K. (2017). Heinz Kohut's Theory of Aggression and Rage. Psychoanal. Psychol., 34(3):361-367. […]
 
8. 
Safran, J.D. (2016). Agency, Surrender, and Grace in Psychoanalysis. Psychoanal. Psychol., 33(1):58-72. […]
 
9. 
Ginot, E. (2007). Intersubjectivity and Neuroscience: Understanding Enactments and Their Therapeutic Significance Within Emerging Paradigms. Psychoanal. Psychol., 24(2):317-332. […]
 
10. 
Schwartz Cooney, A. (2016). Whose Defective Self is it Anyway?: Response to Gerhardt’s “Libidinal and Destructive Envy”. Psychoanal. Perspect., 13(1):24-31. […]
 
11. 
Sirote, A. (2015). The Patient Who Had Me Committed: A Mutually Influential Relationship Between Patient and Analyst in the Context of a Broadening Analytic Frame. Psychoanal. Perspect., 12(1):1-14. […]
 
12. 
Aibel, M. (2014). Response to Commentaries. Psychoanal. Perspect., 11(2):188-197. […]
 
13. 
Kaplan, C.M. (2013). “Sudden Holes in Space and Time”: Trauma, Dissociation, and the Precariousness of Everyday Life. Psychoanal. Inq., 33(5):467-478. […]
 
14. 
Fosshage, J.L. (2007). Searching for Love and Expecting Rejection: Implicit and Explicit Dimensions in Cocreating Analytic Change. Psychoanal. Inq., 27(3):326-347. […]
 
15. 
Schwartz Cooney, A. (2017). “Going Too Far” or Shifting the Paradigm? An Intergenerational Response to Dr. Slochower’s Relational Heroines. Psychoanal. Dial., 27(3):300-306. […]
 
16. 
Slochower, J. (2017). Going Too Far: Relational Heroines and Relational Excess. Psychoanal. Dial., 27(3):282-299. […]
 
17. 
Levine, L. (2016). Mutual Vulnerability: Intimacy, Psychic Collisions, and the Shards of Trauma. Psychoanal. Dial., 26(5):571-579. […]
 
18. 
Bonovitz, C. (2016). On Seeing What Is Not Said: The Concrete Mode of Psychic Functioning and the Development of Symbolization. Psychoanal. Dial., 26(3):280-293. […]
 
19. 
Ipp, H. (2016). Interweaving the Symbolic and Nonsymbolic in Therapeutic Action: Discussion of Gianni Nebbiosi’s “The Smell of Paper”. Psychoanal. Dial., 26(1):10-16. […]
 
20. 
Csillag, V. (2014). Ordinary Sadism in the Consulting Room. Psychoanal. Dial., 24(4):467-482. […]
 
21. 
Castellano, D.L. (2013). Trauma Triangles and Parallel Processes: Geometry and the Supervisor/Trainee/Patient Triad. Psychoanal. Dial., 23(6):720-732. […]
 
22. 
Davies, J.M. (2013). My Enfant Terrible is Twenty: A Discussion of Slavin's and Gentile's Retrospective Reconsideration of “Love in the Afternoon”. Psychoanal. Dial., 23(2):170-179. […]
 
23. 
Levine, L. (2012). Into Thin Air: The Co-Construction of Shame, Recognition, and Creativity in an Analytic Process. Psychoanal. Dial., 22(4):456-471. […]
 
24. 
Rappoport, E. (2012). Creating the Umbilical Cord: Relational Knowing and the Somatic Third. Psychoanal. Dial., 22(3):375-388. […]
 
25. 
Schlesinger, G. (2012). A Brief History of Ghosts: Commentary on Paper by Laurel Moldawsky Silber. Psychoanal. Dial., 22(1):129-138. […]
 
26. 
Solow Glennon, S. (2012). Solitude: Potential Gift, Danger or Both: Commentary on Paper by Danielle Knafo. Psychoanal. Dial., 22(1):76-82. […]
 
27. 
Laor, I. (2009). The Holy See: The Individual and the Group-Intersubjective Meetings. Psychoanal. Dial., 19(4):486-501. […]
 
28. 
Layton, L. (2009). Who's Responsible? Our Mutual Implication in Each Other's Suffering. Psychoanal. Dial., 19(2):105-120. […]
 
29. 
Suchet, M. (2007). Unraveling Whiteness. Psychoanal. Dial., 17(6):867-886. […]
 
30. 
Sands, S.H. (2007). Dissociation, the Analyst's Vulnerability, and the Body: Review of Awakening the Dreamer: Clinical Journeys by Philip M. Bromberg. Psychoanal. Dial., 17(5):741-751. […]
 
 
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