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Tip: Understanding Rank

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you do a search, you can sort the results bibliographically alphabetical or by “rank”. What is Rank?

Rank refers to the search engine’s “best guess” as to the relevance of the result to the search you specified. The exact method of ranking used varies a bit depending on the search. In its most basic level, when you specify a single search term, rank looks at the density of the matches for the word in the document, and how close to the beginning of the document they appear as a measure of importance to the paper’s topic. The documents with the most matches and where the term is deemed to have the most importance, have the highest “relevance” and are ranked first (presented first).

When you specify more than one term to appear anywhere in the article, the method is similar, but the search engine looks at how many of those terms appear, and how close together they appear, how close to the beginning of the document, and can even take into account the relative rarity of the search terms and their density in the retrieved file, where infrequent terms count more heavily than common terms.

To see a simple example of this, search for the words (not the phrase, so no quotes):

unconscious communications

Look at the density of matches in each document on the first page of the hits. Then go to the last page of matched documents, and observe the density of matches within the documents.

A more complex search illustrates this nicely with a single page and only 15 matches:

counter*tr* w/25 “liv* out” w/25 enact*

There are a lot of word forms and variants of the words (due to the * wildcards) above that can match, but the proximity (w/25) clause limits the potential for matching. What’s interesting here though is how easily you can see the match density decrease as you view down the short list.

The end result of selecting order by rank is that the search engine’s best “guess” as to which articles are more relevant appear higher on the list than less relevant articles.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

 
List of Articles


Volume 19 (2017)

Issue 1
Editorial
Deepening our understanding of the importance of the other in the formation of the self  1
Maggie Zellner and David Olds
Article
Mentalizing homeostasis: The social origins of interoceptive inference  3
Aikaterini Fotopoulou and Manos Tsakiris
Commentaries
Social regulation of allostasis: Commentary on Mentalizing homeostasis: The social origins of interoceptive inference by Fotopoulou and Tsakiris  29
Shir Atzil and Lisa Feldman Barrett
Beyond one Bayesian brain: Modeling intra- and inter-personal processes during social interaction: Commentary on Mentalizing homeostasis: The social origins of interoceptive inference by Fotopoulou & Tsakiris  35
Dimitris Bolis and Leonhard Schilbach
What touch can communicate: Commentary on “Mentalizing homeostasis: the social origins of interoceptive inference” by Fotopoulou and Tsakiris  39
Peter Fonagy and Chloe Campbell
Self-evidencing babies: Commentary on “Mentalizing homeostasis: The social origins of interoceptive inference” by Fotopoulou & Tsakiris  43
Karl J. Friston
The role of the mother's mental state in mentalizing homeostasis: Commentary on “Mentalizing Homeostasis” by Fotopoulou & Tsakiris  49
Larry Sandberg and Fred Busch
Some innate predictions are social in nature: Commentary on “Mentalizing homeostasis” by Fotopoulou and Tsakiris  55
Mark Solms
Applying an attachment and microanalytic lens to “embodied mentalization”: Commentary on “Mentalizing homeostasis: the social origins of interoceptive inference” by Fotopoulou and Tsakiris  59
M. Steele, H. Steele and B. Beebe
Embodied mentalization and selfhood: Commentary on “Mentalizing homeostasis: The social origins of interoceptive inference” by Fotopoulou and Tsakiris  67
Dan Zahavi and Philippe Rochat
Response
Mentalizing homeostasis: the social origins of interoceptive inference – replies to Commentaries  71
Aikaterini Fotopoulou and Manos Tsakiris
Clinical Reports
EnRAGEd: Introductory notes on aggression in a case of orbitofrontal syndrome  77
Jose Fernando Muoz Ziga
A neuropsychoanalytic understanding and treatment for a borderline patient who used cannabis  87
Daniela Flores Mosri
The impact of early childhood narcissistic injury on rehabilitation prognosis following mild traumatic brain injury in adulthood  103
Ohr Barak
Society Proceedings
Bulletin of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society  117
 
Issue 2
Editorial
Remembering Jaak Panksepp  123
Maggie Zellner
Articles
Advancing Freud’s dream: A dynamic-relational neurobiologically informed approach to psychotherapy  127
Jacqueline L. Kinley and Sandra M. Reyno
Seeing through the eyes of the perpetrator: A goal-directed function of introjection  143
Dianne Trumbull
Society Proceedings
On the way to bridging the gap between the mental apparatus and the neurobiological layer  159
Dietmar Dietrich, Gerhard Zucker and Klaus Doblhammer
Bulletin of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society  175
Maria Sonia Goergen
Reflections on the neuroscientific legacy of Jaak Panksepp (19432017)  183
Douglas F. Watt
Remembrances of Jaak Panksepp  199
Bonny Astor, Ken Davis, Daniela Flores Mosri, Anesa Miller, David Pincus, Mark Solms, Oliver Turnbull, Doug Watt, Yoram Yovell and Maggie Zellner
Research and symposia abstracts from the 18th Congress of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society, 2017  209
 
Report on the 18th Congress of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society, London: “Compulsion to predict: The development of the self and its disorders”  241
Daniela Flores Mosri
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