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Tip: To see the German word that Freud used to refer to a concept…

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Want to know the exact German word that Freud used to refer to a psychoanalytic concept? Move your mouse over a paragraph while reading The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud and a window will emerge displaying the text in its original German version.

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Berman, E. (1996). The Ferenczi Renaissance: Sándor Ferenczi: Reconsidering Active Interventions by Martin Stanton (Northvale, NJ: Aronson, 1991, xv + 226 pp.) The Legacy of Sándor Ferenczi, edited by Lewis Aron and Adrienne Harris (Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press, 1993, xxiii + 294 pp.). Psychoanal. Dial., 6(3):391-411.

The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi, Vol. 1, 1908-1914, edited by Eva Brabant, Ernst Falzeder, and Patrizia Giampieri-Deutch under the supervision of André Haynal; translated by Peter T. Hoffer (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1993, xxxv + 584 pp.) [→]

(1996). Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 6(3):391-411

The Ferenczi Renaissance: Sándor Ferenczi: Reconsidering Active Interventions by Martin Stanton (Northvale, NJ: Aronson, 1991, xv + 226 pp.)

The Legacy of Sándor Ferenczi, edited by Lewis Aron and Adrienne Harris (Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press, 1993, xxiii + 294 pp.)

Review by:
Emanuel Berman, Ph.D.

Sandor ferenczi was born on July 7, 1873, and died (of pernicious anemia) on May 22, 1933. One might add, metaphorically, that he was assassinated by Ernest Jones in 1957 and reborn in the 1980s and the 1990s. The authors and editors of the books reviewed here are among those who helped resurrect him.

Describing the past is, of course, a major way of shaping the present and influencing the future. Major splits in nations and in social movements focus on the way historical figures are interpreted: the same person is a hero to some and a villain to others.

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